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of the world," britain's top-selling sunday tabloid and part of rupert murdoch's global media empire, has been afflicted by claims of phone hacking. david cameron expressed his shock that the phone of a girl who was murdered years ago was hacked into by a "news of the world" correspondent. >> the scandal has been growing and growing as more and more people learned that their phones had been hacked. now, a much more serious allegation has shocked the country. 13-year-old 2 went missing -- 13-year-old milly dowler went missing. there were allegations that "news of the world" packed into her phone and that some messages might have been deleted in that act. >> if these allegations are true, this is a dreadful act, a dreadful situation. what i have read in the papers is quite shocking -- that someone could do this -- while knowing that the police were trying to find this person and find out what had happened. >> there is more pressure on the prime minister's friend, rebekah brooks, chief executive of news international in the u.k., editor at "news of the world" when milly dowler went missing. she h
robinson reports. >> end to britain's most powerful, most feared media going you will. the policemen are there to protect rupert and james murdoch, not take that -- them into questioning. that fell into a crew of m.p.'s. his wife was behind him. offering physical and emotional support. his son and once heir apparent sat anxiously at his side throughout. >> i would like to say how sorry i am and how sorry we are. >> rupert murdoch was determined to deliver one key line. >> i would just like to say one sentence -- this is the most humbling day of my life. thank you. >> they were sorry, they were humble but whose fault was the criminality in their company? >> do you accept that ultimately you are responsible for this whole fiasco? >> no. >> who is responsible? >> the people they trusted to run it and then maybe the people they trusted. >> who that was he wasn't say. >> this is not an excuse. maybe it's an explanation. news world is less than 1 -- news corp is less than 1% of our company. i employ 53,000 people around the world. >> at this point his wife patrolleded him to stop banging t
. the international response has been mixed. britain has given 23 million pounds to somalia this year. the u.s. barely half of that. germany and france are among those accused of ignoring the alarm bells. >> the job has been dangerously inadequate. britain is setting a good lead. we expect others to contribute. there are signs that people are putting their shoulders into it. we need that to happen rapidly. >> money is not the only problem. the famine has taken hold in areas controlled or influenced by a militant islamist group. they have made it too dangerous for foreign aid groups to operate. now, they said that the ban has been lifted but the politics are complicated and help is not getting to the right people fast enough. the familiar images of hunger and helplessness and the predictable scramble for money and access as the famine bites into somalia. >> at least one person is reported to have been killed in malawi during protests against the government of the president. demonstrations have been held in cities across the country despite an earlier court ruling banning the protests. police sealed off
. a phone hacking scandal of britain's best-selling sunday newspaper deepens. >>> facebook teams up with skype to give its users more facetime. >> and we'll tell you about the manhattan food fight over italian eating. >> it's been a mixed day on the stock markets so far. we've seen some moderate gains in the asia-pacific region. and a positive start to today's trading in europe. >> absolutely right. we're seeing markets hanging out a little bit. we've got a couple of interest rate decisions. so, we are higher as of -- well, as of right now, as you can see. but only by about barely at all. interest rate decisions, european central bank, it's widely expected that the ecb president will raise interest rates for the second time in three months. with euro inflation expected to rise 25 basis points. 0.25%. that would take the lending to 1.5%. >> interest rates in asia as well. a mixed day after the markets, after china announced late yesterday, that hong kong and shanghai, moving in different directions. one thing analysts agree on this is likely to be the final interest rate rise in the
by a judge will be set up to look into the phone hacking scandal of britain's best-selling newspaper, "news of the world." he said he takes full responsibility also for making the paper's former editor, andy coulson, the director of communications and expects to be judged on that. while there are reports that mr. coulson will be arrested, let's go live now to the news conference in downing street. >> and that isn't just about relationships with news international. that applies to everybody. and i think that's where we really need -- and i think that's where we have a genuine opportunity. this is, if you like, a sort of cathartic moment for politicians to say we're going to have these inquiries, they're going to be difficult for everybody to learn the lessons of, they're going to come out hopefully with a new way of regulating the press that ensures press freedom but also press responsibility, and then the politicians are going to step up to the plate and stop, frankly, just trying to curry favor with the media, but instead regulate properly so that actually we have a better situation. this
: but "the news of the world" w w, which is why the famous and the powerful in britain have feared and loathed the tabloid for years. case in point? remember when sarah ferguson was caught selling access to prince andrew? >> 500,000 pounds when you can, to me -- open doors. reporter: and this headline. when prince harry angered his girlfrfrnd by visiting a strip club. how did the paper know? they eavesdropped on the prince's voicemail. >> you have to get the story at all costs. you go and do anything. >> reporter: even breaking the law? >> absolutely breaking the law. >> reporter: at least symbolically here in britain, it is the queen that prime ministers report to. what this scandal, suppressed for so long, is revealing is that rupert murdoch is the one who's really had their ear. every prime minister here for the last 30 years has needed the endorsement of murdoch and his media empire to win election. >> i think it's reasonable for any of us to observe that the murdoch corporation has too much power. >> reporter: outside "the news of the world" offices today, some celebrated the
, llc -- where they're coming from. >> caption colorado, llc comments@captioncolorado.com britain's prime minister is grilled on his ties to the murdoch family. elizabeth palmer has that story. >> you live and you learn, and believe you me i have learned. >> mitchell: on this side of the atlantic bill whitaker discovered how easy it is to hack into cell phones in the u.s. a government program exists to help americans avoid foreclosure and stay in their homes-- we find out why so few people know about it. and when the florida marlins hit the skids, they turned to a manager with experience. lots of experience. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. this is the "cbs evening news" with s >> mitchell: and good evening, scott is off tonight. i'm russ mitchell. britain's tabloid phone hacking scandal has reached the highest levels of the british government. today prime minister david cameron addressed an emergency session of parliament on the crisis, even as americans find out they are just as vulnerable to phone hackers. we have two reports tonight
think the murdoch empire and great britain is coming down. if it leaps the atlantic to the united states, it's really big trouble. and i feel sorry for murdoch going up against the parliamentary committee because it's going to be very, very tough on him. i don't know if he had anything to do with it. but this is aucwfully high up, joe. it's reached to murdoch's son and the prime minister's office in great britain. this is going to metastasize. >> you hear all of the talk in the press about the murdoches, the murdoches, the murdoches. they don't run the company by themselves. there is a board. and at some point, they're going to tell the murdochs this type of dynasty did not work in egypt. it's not going to work in news corp. you're going to have to step down. and i suspect that you're going to see -- i agree with pat. i don't see how the murdoch family survives this. i don't see how the sons take over the empire. this keeps exploding oochlgt. >> -- exploding. >> a couple of things, the brand has been damaged irreparably already, whatever comes across the states here and the department of
. >>> the news of the world scandal is a political scandal former senior aide to britain's prime minister david cameron has been arrested in a growing scandal involving phone hacking and corruption. >>> finally, let me finish with the space shuttle launch today and the wondrous pioneering president jack kennedy once championed. >>> we start with the jobs numbers. david corn, msnbc political analyst. michael steele is the former chairman of the republican national committee. now an msnbc political analyst. did you hear the glee, the giggles of delight on your side of the aisle? michele bachmann said she hopes the bad numbers help her. >> no, no. >> she said that. >> i know what she said. let's just get serious for a moment. you had 18,000 jobs created last month. the 54,000 for may was the revised down to 25,000. the reality of it is americans are still hurting and both the administration and members of congress and the republican leadership, in particular, we can't paint specifically on job creation, need to get serious about this. all the talk about the debt and all the dancing belies -- >> yo
britain's corridors of power. brooks is answering police questions. >> reporter: in the cozy world of british politics and media, rebecca brooks was at its very center. she wined and dined the rich and powerful on behalf of her boss and mentor, rupert murdoch. brooks first came to news international as a secretary at "news of the world." she quickly developed a reputation for her tenacity as a journalist, reportedly once disguising herself as a cleaning lady to scoop a competitor. described as both ruthless and charming, she was soon the youngest editor of the "news of the world," and shortly after "the sun," both named by murdoch's news international. she spearheaded a controversial campaign to, quote, name and shame alleged pedophiles, publishing their names and addresses in the paper. as the editor of "the sun," brooks testified to parliament that her paper had paid police officers for information. and it was under her editorship that the "news of the world" allegedly paid a private investigator to hack into the voicemail messages of millie doweller, the 13-year-old girl murdere
irony that in the contrast between the sort of thing his newspapers have done in britain and what his politics is, the fox news cable channel here. we should at this point stressed that there is no evidence of any sort of misconduct by any of his american news outlets, be it fox or "the journal" or "the new york post." host: what is his reputation in the uk? guest: his reputation is it one of the most powerful people in the country. he owned almost 34% of the national media market. bskyb, which he on a share -- they blocked a controlling share -- is the big pay-tv service. he has been a huge figure in our public life for the past 20, 30 years, which is why so many of his opponents are so pleased that his reputation has not taken such a beating -- has now taken such a beating. host: next call for alex spillius comes from woodstock, illinois. caller: i picked up "the economist" magazine the other day, an excellent edition. on page 12, they go into their editorial basically, and it is based out of london. it says "if it is proven that news corp. managers conducted lawbreaking, they shoul
in arizona. hello. caller: i can see this going on in great britain, i guess the police are involved. but then they are doing it for us in the same manner. scanning e-mails, looking for certain words and what ever. i do not see any difference. i mean, they are exchanging information, but the fact that the government is concerned in one place and not the other is somewhat humorous or dreadful, depending on your point of view. host: thank you for calling the idea this morning. a bit more from the can paulson editorial this morning. every news organization host: next call on the british phone hacking scandal and its impact comes from denver. hello. caller: i'd think it has been going on for a long time in america. the sponsors, rep john de gaulle, michigan, and republicans worked together with the chamber of commerce to defeat it in 1997. him and reagan had health plans to take $1,900,000 in total compensation and resigned. his three underlings took almost 1100 million dollars. host: tie this into what we are talking about. caller: i think that this is going on for a long time. where do
to bailing out greece. >> britain is not in the euro. while i am prime minister, it will never be. we should not be involved in the euro areas internal arrangements. only euro countries were involved in the first bailout. only eurozone countries have been in the discussion about further bailout. it is right not to use the e.u.- wide financial stability mechanism for future aid to greece. >> the worst outcome for the british economy from the greek crisis would be a disorderly and chaotic the of fault -- default and departure from the euro. what discussions have we had about preparing for that default which is inevitable? the president himself has said that it does not need to be disorderly to dissolve the without the currency's much destruction. >> what is causing disorder and the fact they're going bankrupt. nothing said in this chamber will alter that. if greece can neither withdraw or default, then good money via our money or the imf will be wasted bailing out greece. why not leave an orderly withdrawal of greece from the euro? >> is it time to dispose of these things? checks seem to have
newspaper accused of widespread phone hacking as its former editor who became a spokesman for britain's prime minister is arrested, "early" this friday morning, july 8th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> and good friday morning to you from the kennedy space center, i'm erica hill. you're looking at a live picture there of launch pad 39a and of course the shuttle atlanta as we prepare to watch and countdown to the final mission for nasa's shuttle program. good to have you with us. chris wragge is in new york. good morning my friend. >> good morning. the shot looks great. we need a little cooperation from mother nature, right? that's if. the only thing holding us back this morning. >> that's exactly what we need, a lot of fingers crossed. from nasa's point of view otherwise everything is ready for this morning's scheduled launch. as chris mentioned we're not sure whether or not mother nature will cooperate. bob orr has the latest on the planned launch. good morning. >> reporter: good morning, erica. "atlantis" is all systems green there but the weather forecast frankly is very bleak a
. >> reporter: it was a wild day in britain's emergency session of parliament today. the focus shifted from rupert murdoch to britain's prime minister, david cameron. but the prime minister's case is about poor judgment and nothing to do with any crimes. david cameron defended himself for hiring a former editor of "news of the world" andy callson as his communications chief even though he may have known about the phone hacking. >> i have said very clearly that if it turns out andy coulson knew about the hacking at the "news of the world" he would not only have lied to me, but to the police, to a select committee, to the press complaints commission and perjuried himself in a court of law. >> reporter: cameron was advised against hiring him, did it anyway, and was forced to resign and arrested last week. he said in parliament that cameron was guilty of a gross error in judgment. >> it's not about hindsight, mr. speaker. it's not about whether mr. coulson lied to him. it's about the information and warnings that the prime minister ignored. >> reporter: cameron said if he had to do it over he w
the scandal ever closer into the political arena. and think about this, not only has britain lost faith in their journalists, but they've lost faith in politicians and now in the police as well. a point to make is, growing up as a kid in london, you look at scotland yard and stunned by their investigate zeal and incorruptibility, hold on a second, they were taking payments from journalists. >> speaking of fragility, rupert murdoch himself is 80 years old. today he was doddering. much of the question today, somebody tried to pie him in the face, he looked like a mugging victim. how plausible is his claim today he's really not in charge anymore? >> well, i think it's inherently a difficult defense because he might say he can't remember, but that raises questions about his role of chief executive of a prominent, multi-billion dollar business, one of the predatory media companies in the world, so he can defend himself against sort of charges that he knew about criminal activity from british journalists, but that only puts him into deeper water in terms of chief executive and chairman of new
's enough. but this is a general problem about the culture of tabloid journalism in britain, which has been addressed by people like david cameron himself. almost a corporate shake speer and drama, it's about really a battle between two bruised institution. murdock's decision to close the paper, is it damage control? it because the goism is worried -- >> i certainly thin that's a huge part. >> you're saying he may be close the paper in part because of business and finance reasons? >> clearly. >> this is a debacle. >> exactly. no and very, very strong opinion was this was to protect rebecca wade and a former editor who was the editor when her phone was hacked. >> she's now the chief executive. let me put this conversation on paw. we're going to go for a bit of breaking news regards the 135th and final space shuttle mission. john zarrella is standing by to talk about a docking manure which is under waite. john? >> about sick feel separates it. this is the final time a space shuttle will ever dock with the international space station, less than five feet away. you can see in the live picture t
'd choose the latter. despite the horror show going on in britain i'm still with mr. jefferson. >>> a reporter gets too close to the story. went to state senator lori kline's office about gun ownership. a big second amendment. delined pulled out a pink loaded pistol and pointed the weapon's laser at his chest. he said she told him not to worry, since she didn't have her hand on the trigger. after the story was published kline said she didn't point the gun at him and he himself sat down in front of it. whatever happened, it we all agree loaded guns shouldn't be part of the interview process. >>> now, moving to hollywood, arnold schwarzenegger gets back in the saddle. the former governor of california just signed on to his first postscandal project. a western action film, a sci-fi film "the land stand." shooting on the mother vie is scheduled to start in september. i wish him luck. actually i really did like "true lies." >>> former british prime minister says murdoch's people used noncriminals to access health and banking records and tried to bring down his government. how far is
in the local pub in britain, losing your job normally ends in drinking a pint, and these journalists had a lot to reflect on. the 168-year-old tabloid is a british institution. the phone hacking scandal left it in a political vortex, from which it couldn't escape. its owner, rupert murdoch, realized his entire empire was at risk of being tainted. one can only imagine the conversation he had with his son james, who runs the uk business. >> i feel regret. clearly the practices of certain individuals did not live up to the standards and quality of journalism that we believe in and that i believe in. >> reporter: it was the revelation that a murdered school girl had been targeted by journalists from the paper who eavesdropped on her cell phone messages that was the beginning of the end for the paper. hacking into cell phone messages is illegal in the uk. the scandal that the "news of the world" had been systematical systematically eavesdropping on people for years had been swirling around westminster, with some telling politicians that it was the work of a rogue reporter. >> i believe he was the o
messages of millie dowler, a 13 yeerl girl murdered in britain whose court case and investigation made front page headlines. the allegations didn't come to light until almost a decade later after brooks scaled the public ladder to be chief executive of news international, a position she resigned last week. brooks has denied having any knowledge of phone hacking by her staff. it was brooks who cemented a relationship with prime minister david cameron, inviting him to lunches at her country home with the head of news corporation, rupert murdoch's son, james. there have been several arrests in the phone hacking scandal so far. rebecca brooks is the highest profile yet, and the one closest to rupert murdoch himself. >> brooks admitted to paying police for information. i asked lisa bloom why it wasn't a bigger deal back then. >> i think we got the answer to that today, don. it appears law enforcement was intimately tied up with the corruption scan danld hacking scandal with britain's top cop saying he should have handled things differently. i believe this is the beginning of the uk's waterg
on with doing things that britain should be doing in the world. whether that is trading with countries like nigeria or leading the aid effort in the horn of africa where we had been told is not just catastrophe, it is also a famine. >> mr. speaker, yesterday rupert murdoch was asked about his secret meetings with the prime minister and his government. he replied, i wish they would leave me alone. >> one of the outcomes is that there will be a lot more of leave everybody alone. >> in the investigation, the information commissioner found 861 personnel information transactions which were possibly identified as coming from 89 newspaper journalists. can the prime minister confirm that the inquiry that he has announced will be able to look into the unlawful practices going on at mirror group newspapers? >> i think the gentleman makes an important point. what we should not believe automatically that these practices were spread right across the media, it would be naive to think they were restricted to one newspaper or one newspaper group. when you look at evidence, it is clear that they went wider.
response has been mixed. 22 million pounds have been given from great britain, with half of that from the united states. those who sent 1.6 million pounds are accused of a nut -- ignoring the alarm. >> this is overall, dangerously inadequate. we expect others to contribute. others are beginning to put their shoulders to the wheel. this is happening rapidly and vigorously. >> money is not the only problem. there is a militant islamic group, that has made it too dangerous for foreign aid groups to operate directly. the ban has been lifted but the politics are complicated, and the aid is not getting to the right people fast enough. and so the images of hunger and helplessness, and the scramble for money and access, as the famine bites into somalia. >> in other news, the leader of ireland has launched an attack on the vatican, for encouraging the leadership not to report pedophilia by the priests. he says this is a function of elitism and our system that is present in catholicism. libya says the removal of gadaffi from power is not on the table. in afghanistan, forces have handed over sec
they call in britain, the gutter press. dan rivers, cnn, london. >> it's not clear what if anything rupert murdoch will say when he sits before parliament at 9:30 a.m. eastern time. >> his media empire hangs in the balance many people say as does his career as news corp ceo. it leads to the question of the day and question that's central to today's hearing, do you think that rupert murdoch knew about the phone hacking? >> on facebook, benny says he owns several corporations in different countries. t there's no way he can be involved in day-to-day operation of any of them. >> peter says on our blog, don't know if he did or not. the issue should be why he created a work culture that allowed this to happen. news corp needs to be held accountable and that includes the top officers of the organization. >> and on facebook, if he knew what his company was doing, shame on him. if he didn't know, double shame on him. a lot of different comments this morning. keep them coming. >> send us an e-mail or tweet or contact us on facebook. >> phone hacking hearing just five minutes away. we'll have live co
's when i stumbled upon william e. dodd. >> britain's parliament has gone into its summer recess. the bbc parliament channel be kept the last several months in the house of commons in british politics in this one-hour record review program. some of the issues covered include the news corp. phone hacking scandal come in the royal wedding in president obama says it. >> hello and welcome to the special edition of the record review, when we look after an eventful summer term at parliament, he turns anything distinguished guests, rigorous questioning and much in the way of political drama. >> for the grandson of a kenyan who served as a cook and the british army to stand before you as president of the united states. >> this is a shocking mass. in fact, it's a scandal. >> have you ever received payment for any news? >> absolutely not. i can't believe he suggested that. >> the fact we do not have democratic legitimacy undermines our capacity to act as a check and balance. >> why disney know about these arguments? the house of commons is on this bill tonight. >> you can ask about strike because t
his media empire, beginning in australia where he's from, moving here to britain and then to the u.s. right now he's doing everything he can to try to preserve it. >> reporter: rupert murdoch arrived back in new york last night. hoping the newspaper scandal that's consumed britain doesn't also envelop his american interests or influence. as owner of "the wall street journal," the "new york post" and more, murdoch watched his company shares swoon when the phone hacking allegations struck, and then stabilize. now an fbi probe is officially under way looking into whether murdoch employees paid investigators to hack into the voice mails of 9/11 victims. this as the directors of news corp begin hiring former u.s. attorney mary jo white and former attorney general michael mucasey. >> it is unclear at this point how much jeopardy they are potentially in because we simply don't know all the facts. they are potentially subject to prosecution under a statute called the foreign corrupt practices act in connection with any bribes that were paid in england. >> reporter: here in england, the eve
, and that means that we still have a big hole to fill. >> britain's phone hacking scandal reached prime minister cameron's office today. police arrested his one-time communications director, former "news of the world" editor, andy colson. allegations that the paper hacked the phones of celebrities and politicians cost colson his job at the "news of the world" back in 2007. he quit cameron's government in january as the scandal grew. the prime minister took responsibility for hiring colson, and called for government investigation into the paper's conduct. >> this is a wake-up call. over the decades, on the watch of both labor leaders and conservative leaders, politicians and the press have spent time courting support, not confront the problems. it's on my watch that the music has stopped. >> "news of the world" will fold after sunday's edition. the tabloid part of rupert murdoch's media empire which includes the waun"wall street journal," "new york post" and fox news. >> seven people and the gunman dead, grand rapids police say roderic dantzler opened fire at two different homes. dantzler's daugh
in britain put media magnate rupert murdoch on the hot seat today before a committee of parliament. along with his son and a former top executive, murdoch faced close questioning, and a closer encounter with a pie plate. outside, the sidewalks were crowded with protesters against the murdochs and their newspapers, and british prime minister david cameron. inside, rupert murdoch was confronted by british lawmakers over allegations that his tabloids hacked the phones of celebrities, royals, slain soldiers, and murder victims. at the outset, he and son james, the current c.e.o. of news corporation, set a tone of contrition. >> these actions don't live up to the standards our company aspires to everywhere around the world. and it is our determination to put things right, make sure this doesn't happen again, and to be the company that i know we've always aspired to be. as for my comments, mr. chairman, and my statement, which i believe was around the closure of "the news of the world newspaper" >> brown: the long-simmering scandal at murdoch's "news of the world" exploded two weeks ago with re
. someone tried to throw a glass in my face. so many people, particularly mps, in britain, are taking credit for taking apart murdoch's empire. it was sean hoare. he was a good guy. stood up for good values in journalism and so disappointed that andy coulson, who regularly asked him to hack into people's phones, you know, the master of the dark arts turned round when we started getting caught. it wasn't us, so it wasn't me, it was the reporters, and the reporters now are getting, you know, arrested or brought into scotland yard. time and time again, rebekah brooks said we knew nothing about it it wasn't us. and andy coulson said it wasn't us, and that made sean hoare angry it made me angry. you generally shouldn't throw your sheep to the wolves. >> was he worried about something, did he have issues because of the scandal? >> he -- well, i mean, i felt quite stressed for the last two or three weeks particularly, i think my blood pressure is a bit raised. and if you've got an existing i believe heart condition, he looked a bit of a mess recently. and the stress of this wouldn't have helped. i
because after tomorrow, no mas. the paper is one of great britain's oldest publications and has the largest circulation, but it could not survive a hacking scandal that charged some employees with committing high tech crimes with thousands of potential victims. r a paper folds because it doesn't have the circulation, not popular anymore, lost its luster. that's not the case here. >> this is the biggest selling, the most popular paper, more than 2 million copies every sunday, it sells. people love its scoops. they have been reading it, despite previous allegations that it had been hacking into royals and celebrity voice mails. but this time it went too far. it had hacked into the voice mail of a kidnap and murder victim, a girl, and the fact that they were not only listening to the voice messages as they were searching for this girl, but they were deleting her voice mails to make room for new ones so they could listen in to the new ones, giving her parents false hope she was still alive and potentially interfering with the police investigation as they looked for her. >> so rupert
right now the phone hacking scandal in great britain reaches the highest echelons of government. with prime minister david cameron facing cheers and jeers in an uncommon emergency session of the house of commons. >> i have an old fashioned view about innocent until proven guilty. >> prime minister david cameron addressing the house of commons. >> if it turns out andy coulson knew about the hacking at the news of the world he will not only have lied to me, but he would have lied to the police, to a select committee torque the press complaints commission, and of course, perjured himself in a court of law. >> former news of the world ed tore andy coulson was until january cameron's communications director. >> with 20/20 hindsight and all that has followed i would not have offered him the job and i expect that he wouldn't have taken it. >> coulson was arrested this month suspected of corruption in the u.s. voice mail hacking and police bribery scandal. >> you live and you learn and believe you me i have learned. >> even after he owned up to the lesson, opposition leader ed millband
featuring julia roberts and christie turlington are being banned in britain. [ male announcer ] succeeding in today's market requires decisive action. i go to e-trade and tap into the power of revolutionary mobile apps to trade wherever. whenever. life isn't fully experienced sitting idly by. neither is investing. [ birds chirping ] [ male announcer ] get ready for the left lane. the volkswagen autobahn for all event is back. right now, get a great deal on new volkswagen models, including the jetta, awarded a top safety pick by the iihs. that's the power of german engineering. hurry in and lease the jetta s for just $179 a month. ♪ visit vwdealer.com today. ♪ [ cat meows ] ♪ [ whistles ] ♪ [ cat meows ] ♪ [ ting! ] [ male announcer ] travelers can help you protect the things you care about and save money with multi-policy discounts. are you getting the coverage you need and the discounts you deserve? for an agent or quote, call 800-my-coverage or visit travelers.com. >>> hi, everybody, welcome back to "newsnation." the countdown is now on. the 2012 olympics is one year away. sens
a splash. she switched last year from representing kenya to start swimming for great britain. her goal is to represent the team at the olympics. she often trains two times a day, once before school and once after. >> getting up at 5:00 in the morning is not get any easier. >> she started swimming at the age of four while she was living in kenya. she was born in the u.k. and in 2007 decided to return here. she boarded at plymouth college where she befriended a diving gold medalist. she has now moved in with her got parents to set up for the olympics. while most teenagers find it difficult to drag themselves out of bed, she has been here since the crack of dawn. she's incredibly committed to his swimming but she is also very focused on her school work. after a cup of coffee with her friend, it is off to school where she is studying for a levels. double economics is followed by double politics in which she is contemplating a career beyond the swimming pool. she has her work perfect and france to catch up with before squeezing in a driving lesson, all before the end of school. what sometim
and britain's phone hacking scandal. that scandal of course targeted the murder victims, terrorism victims and grieving families of troops killed at war. live report from london after the break. only one calcium supplement does that in one daily dose. new citracal slow release... continuously releases calcium plus d for the efficient absorption my body needs. citracal. >> police today arrested a former editor of "news of the world," that's the british tabloid accused of hacking into people's voice mail accounts and bribing police. the newspaper is owned by media magnate rupert murdoch who owns fox news and "wall street journal." senior international correspondent, dan rivers, joins me live from london. the former editor we're talking about is not just a former editor, also a former aide to the british prime minister. >> reporter: yeah, it's difficult to imagine this getting more serious and bigger in terms of the tentacles that seems to go into politics, journalism, into commerce as well as significant kind of economic aspects to this story because advertisers are pulling out from advertis
and the legacy she's leaving. >> sandra indoe, appreciate it. thank you very much. >>> up next, britain's former prime minister says he was the victim of the phone hacking scandal that keeps widening. we'll have the details for you next. king it hard to breathe, i thought those days might be over. so my doctor prescribed symbicort. it helps significantly improve my lung function, starting within 5 minutes. symbicort doesn't replace a rescue inhaler for sudden symptoms. with symbicort, today i'm breathing better, and that means... game on! symbicort is for copd, including chronic bronchitis and emphysema. it should not be taken more than twice a day. symbicort may increase your risk of lung infections, osteoporosis, and some eye problems. tell your doctor if you have a heart condition or high blood pressure before taking it. [ whistle ] with copd, i thought i might miss out on my favorite tradition. now symbicort significantly improves my lung function, starting within 5 minutes. and that makes a difference in my breathing. today i'm back with my favorite team. ask your doctor about symbicort. i
damage is mounting. today, britain's prime minister meets with the family of a murdered little girl after a murdoch newspaper allegedly hacked her cell phone to gain an edge on that story. actor hugh grant who is both a vocal critic of murdoch and a frequent target of him explains why all of us in the u.s. should even care. >> rupert murdoch does own an enormous amount of your media with fox news and the fox station and 20th century fox pictures and et cetera. and some of your newspapers. i think people need to ask themselves, you know, who is this man who owns such a large part of our media and i think, you know, when you hear some of new allegations about who the "news of the world" was phone hacking and may include, i stress it's allegations at this stage, some of the 9/11 victims, while i don't know, that may strike a chord with americans. >> the heartless details of the milly dowler case is worth receipt be. murdoch news organizations is accused of hacking her cell phone. the tabloid then reportedly deleted messages so her mailbox could keep providing new material to print for six gr
carolina that follows new hampshire. jack, thank you. let's go to britain right now where the scandal surrounding rupert murdoch's media empire is growing. a former "news of the world" reporter who blew the whistle on allegations of phone hacking has reportedly been found dead. police are treating it as an unexplained but not, at least for now, suspicious death. other new developments. in the scandal, the british prime minister david cameron says he'll request a special session of parliament on wednesday. a separate investigation of police corruption is widening after a second top london police official resigned. all this just hours before murdoch faces british law marngs cnn senior international correspondent dan rivers is in london. >> well, wolf, the phone hacking scandal is about to reach its incredibly dramatic climax as rupert and james murdoch arrive at the palace of westminster behind me to face probing questions from politicians about how much they knew about the illegal activities going on in some of their newspapers. >>> when big ben strikes 2:30 in london, the bell will be
powerful media empire in the united states and britain and elsewhere. how badly has his empire been affected by this scandal? >> well, tuesday is going to be a really fascinating day. rupert murdoch and his son and a former editor, rebekah brooks, will be appearing before parliament and will be answering questions and why they have not acted on it. ed miliband, the leader of the labor party -- labour party, they will be arguing for his power to be curbs. there is a big discussion. in the u.s., and they are investigating. tomorrow and the next days and weeks are going to be fascinating in that respect. >> as always, we thank you very much. on to libya now, where rebels have claimed victory in the battle for a strategic town. there are conflicting reports about whether or not they have complete control of the town which has been held since gaddafi -- by gaddafi since march. most of the gaddafi forces are said to be retreating west. rebels say 12 fighters were killed and hundreds wounded. the capture would mark a major rebel breakthrough in their bid to push westward. the foreign minis
can make a splash. she switched last year from representing kenya to start swimming for great britain. her goal is to be at the olympics. she often trains two times a day, once before school and once after. >> getting up at 5:00 in the morning is not get easier. >> she started swimming at the age of four when she was with her family. she was born in the u.k. and decided to return here to pursue her dream. she boarded at plumas college. -- plymouth college. while most teenagers find it hard to drag themselves out of bed in the morning, she has been years since the crack of dawn. she is incredibly committed to his swimming but she is focused on her school work. after a cup of coffee, it is off to school where she is studying for her a levels. she has her work to perfect and friends to catch up with. this is all before the end of school. >> sometimes i get really stressed and fed up. you have to deal with this situation that you are given and you have to deal with both of these things. >> she made a contentious start before representing england. she has struggled. she took a five week br
their recipients. >>> it was a dramatic end for britain's top selling but troubled tabloid. the owners of news of the world say the paper will shut down sunday amid growing controversy over a phone hacking scandal. many of the paper's rivals are covering the story, putting their own spin on the news. the daily telegraph says good-bye cruel world. the daily mail reads the paper that died of shame. the independent says, newspaper sacrificed to save one woman. and the guardian, the scandal that closed the news of the world. mike taibbi has details on what led to the paper's demise. >> reporter: the latest allegation that may have been the breaking point that grieving relatives of british soldiers killed in action had their cell phones hacked and their voice mail messages accessed. >> if these actions are verified, i'm appalled. i find it quite disgusting. >> i feel so appalled. >> prime minister david cameron on both sides of the aisle in a rare emergency session in the house of commons, all in agreement that the public needs to know who was hacked, who did it, and who knew about it. >> once we k
fought so hard the leave britain because of their unaccountable imperial leadership. now look at us. [bleeped]. laftd laughter we'll be right back. >> jon: welcome back. you know, with all this hullabaloo of what's going on, i have neglected to mention last week's women's world cup. our u.s. team unbelievable. up believable. ultimately they lost in the final to japan, but their play throughout the tournament was outstanding, and as a former player and sometimes lady, the goal that they scored in injury time against brazil to tie one of the greatest goals i've ever seen in world cup history. take a look. >> a pinot gets across towards wambach. can you believe it? abby wambach has saved the u.s.a.'s life in this world cup. >> jon: wambach, goooooalllllll. you know what, though, i got to tell you, it's not the same when you see it in the highlight as seeing it live. to see it... excuse me for a minute. i'm just going to... to my changing closet. [laughter] hey, hey, everyone. hey, ladies. >> just ignore him. >> oh, is he coming this way? >> ladies, here's what i want. i want brazil inj
britain because of their unaccountable imperial leadership. now look at us. [bleeped]. laftd laughter we'll be right back. [ wind howl] hello. release mountain freshness. fabio. surprise. it's you. old spice matterhorn. fabio. matterhorn. [ laughs ] [ old spice whistle ] [ man ] i got this new citi thankyou card and started earning loads of points. you got a weather balloon with points? yes i did. [ man ] points i could use for just about anything. ♪ ♪ there it is. [ man ] so i used mine to get a whole new perspective. ♪ [ male announcer ] the new citi thankyou premier card gives you more ways to earn points. what's your story? citi can help you write it. >> jon: welcome back. you know, with all this hullabaloo of what's going on, i have neglected to mention last week's women's world cup. our u.s. team unbelievable. up believable. ultimately they lost in the final to japan, but their play throughout the tournament was outstanding, and as a former player and sometimes lady, the goal that they scored in injury time against brazil to tie one of the greatest goals i've ever seen in wor
was murdered in britain. those allegations did not come to light until almost a decade later after brooks had scaled the corporate ladder to become chief exec tish of news international, a position she resigned last week. brooks has denied having any knowledge of any phone hacking by her staff. it was brooks who cemented a relationship with prime minister david cameron, inviting him to lunches at her country home with the head of news corporation, rue put murdock's son, james. there have been several arrests in the phone-hacking scandal so far but rebecca brooks is the highest profiled yet and the one closest to rue put murdock himself. atika shubert, cnn, london. >> as you can imagine, all of this has pummeled news corp's stock. as for news corp's nasdaq shares, the news of their value has wiped more than $6 billion since the scandal broke on july 4th. that's a drop since july 5th, the first day u.s. investors returned from a long u.s. holiday. that have yet another thing to worry about. inquiries are being made into rue put murdock's newspaper publishing operation in britain. just a reminde
if would be the famous and powerful in britain fear and loathe the tabloid for years. case in point. remember when sarah ferguson was caught selling access to prince andrew. >> 70 and this headline. prince harry angered his girlfriend by visiting a strip club. how did the paper know? they eaves dropped on the prince voice mail. >> you have to get the story at all cost. you go and do anything. >>reporter: even breaking the law. >> absolutely breaking the law. >>reporter: at least symbolically here in britain it is the quaen the prime minister report to. scandal suppressed so long is revealing that murdoch is the one who has really had their ear. every prime minister here for the last 30 years has needed endorsement of murdoch and media empire to win elections. >> i think it is reason for any of us to observe that the murdoch corporation has too much power. >>reporter: outside the news of the world offices today some celebrated the paper downfall. criminal investigation under way many more could go down with it. jeffrey kaufman, abc news london. >>> by the way, rupert murdoch
after this. britain's prime minister, the latest to face tough questions in that hacking scandal. our megapanel itching to weigh in. hoe deep does it go? and is it in too? we're back after this. like "oh no, i cannot do investing." next thing you know he's got a stunning portfolio. shhhh, you're welcome. [ male announcer ] e-trade. investing unleashed. energy is being produced to power our lives. while energy developement comes with some risk, north america's natural gas producers are committed to safely and responsibly providing decades of cleaner burning energy for our country, drilling thousands of feet below fresh water sources within self contained well systems and using state of the art monitoring technologies, rigorous practices help ensure our operations are safe and clean for our communities and the environment we are america's natural gas. yeah, let's check out the horses under the hood! show me the carfax. show me the carfax. horsepower, foxpower, same thing. just show me the carfax. before you buy a used car, get a carfax vehicle history report. see accidents and service r
of fire. britain's prime minister gets an earful from parliament today on the phone hacking scandal. lawmakers are putting david cameron in the hot seat. >> reporter: british lawmakers took aim at the prime minister in a british debate over the phone hacking scandal. >> you live and you learn. and believe you me, i have learned. >> reporter: cameron is taking heat for hiring his former communications chief, andy colson. colson was editor at news of the world, when journalists hacked into the voice mails of politicians. >> with 20/20 hindsight, and all that followed, i would not have offered him the job, and i suspect he wouldn't have taken it. >> it's not about hindsight, mr. speaker. it's about all of the information and warnings that the prime minister ignored. >> reporter: now that colson has been arrested issue the prime minister is under even more pressure to distance him from -- himself from the scandal. >> the questions are being asked about the friends he keeps. >> reporter: cameron met with newscorps executives more than two dozen times since taking office. he denied claims
department here as it did in britain. >> right, it's an interesting theory, lawrence, but at this point there's no evidence to support that. there is this allegation from the daily mirror, which it's worth pointing out is a rival paper to murdoch, there were no names in it. it's very hard to assess the credibility of it. this is clearly the most serious allegation facing news corp. were any of this proven to be true, it would have a devastating blow on news corp. and could ultimately lead to the challenge of the broadcast licenses, which would be the worst blow possible to the company, but at this point we have to be cautious and say look, we haven't seen a lot to support that particular allegation. >> and michael, the broadcast licenses are important because really the newspaper business, murdoch says accurately, it's a tiny piece of his action, just a few percent of what that company is up to, which makes you wonder why did he ever want to stay in that business for any reason other than being a political influence and having that kind of moment that we just heard about of walking in the bac
the greater transparency and the stronger governance we need in britain's policing. let me turn to the specific questions i have been asked in recent days. first, it has been suggested that my chief of staff was behaving wrongly when he didn't take up the commissioneruate's offer to be briefed on police investigations. i have said repeatedly about the police investigation they should pursue the evidence where ever it leads and arrest exactly who they wish. that is exactly what they have done. number ten is the exchange between my chief of staff and john yates. the reply to the police made clear it would not be appropriate to give me or my staff any privileged briefing. the reply that he sent -- the reply that he sent was cleared in advance by my permanent secretary jeremy hayward. just imagine mr. speaker if they had done the opposite. if they had asked for receiving privileged information, even if there is no intention to use it. there would have been justified outrage. to risk any perception that number ten was seeking to influence a police investigation in any way would have
'll have more on that. first some live pictures to show you. david cameron, the prime minister of britain speaking now before the house of parliament. let's listen. looks like we have a little bit of an audio issue. first we'll go back. new abc -- nbc poll governor perry running third behind mitt romney and michelle bachmann. >> he's not at the clard. jim acosta is following this for us from austin, texas. good morning. >> reporter: good morning. aides to rick perry say the governor of texas should make a decision by the end of the summer as to whether or not he'll get in the presidential race. if he does jump in, his face may take center stage. for republicans dissatisfied with the field for 2012 it could be divine intervention at a press conference texas governor rick perry confirmed what he recently told an iowa newspaper that he's feeling called by his faith and his friends to run. >> there's a lot of different ways to be called. my mother may call me for dinner. >> there was no religious overtone. >> no. i don't get confused. i'm a man of faith. >> texas is where the game success pla
and britain's political elite. yesterday the surprise resignation of britain's police chief underlined that. sir paul stephenson isn't suspected of doing anything wrong himself, but it was on his watch that a former "news of the world" editor since arrested in connection with illegal phone hacking was hired as a pr consultant to the police force. all eyes are going to be on the parliamentary committee. now tomorrow rupert murdoch, his son james and rebekah brooks will be in the hot seat and the proceedings will be broadcast live. >> interesting television. liz palmer in london for us. >>> i have the feeling this is just the beginning for this story. now here is jeff floglor with t other headlines. >> a new survey released this morning predicts more hiring for the rest of the year. the association for business economists reports that 43% of respondents say their company will increase employment in the next six months. the highest number in a year. all 73 participants said they planned no significant layoffs but 76% expect economic growth to slow 2% or more. >>> in afghanistan this morning na
. news continues to break in the hacking scandal in britain. a former top murdoch aide rebekah brooks was arrested yesterday. the top two men resigned over questions about a former news of the world reporter and a whittle blower turned up dead. stephanie gosk is covering the story. michael wolff is author of the man who knows the news inside the secret world of rupert murdoch. to the tangled web that may be the best way to describe this hacking scandal as the parties involved, murdoch's empire, government and the police all have ties one to another. it begins with rupert murdoch, the chief of news corporation, and his son james who handles european news. on friday, les hidden resigned, he ran murdoch's dow jones and published the "wall street journal." rebekah brooks ran the tabloid news of the word and went on to run news international. she quit and was arrested yesterday. brooks' deputy at news of the world was andy colson who ran the paper when much of the hacking was going on. he resigned and became top aide for prime minister who he resigned over the hacking scandal. from the pri
:39 now. and another one bites the dust. just after britain's top cop quits, the latest high-profile official to lose his job over the phone hacking scandal. >>> and she refused a security patdown and then ended up in jail. how a passenger turned the tables on a tsa agent. >>> and the market opened up just about 10 minutes ago. let's get a quick check of the early numbers and you can see, it is red across the board. the dow is down 77 points. nasdaq down 12. the s&p down 7. we are going to get an update and breakdown from kcbs moneywatch reporter jason brooks coming up. ,,,,,,,,,, i tell ya, i work a long day, every day. i hang my head out the window. oh man, we're delivering everything you can think of: plywood, cement. i, i enjoy the breeze on my tongue. well uh, and every weekend, seems like we're headin' down to the lake. we're pullin' a boat or somethin'. i don't know why. i just do. it's not a problem. i don't mind as long as we always stop at chevron and get that techron stuff. my ears flop around too. check it out. [ male announcer ] your car takes care of you, care f
in britain today with a second high-level resignation at scotland yard and the death of a whistleblower. good evening, i'm gwen ifill. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the "newshour" tonight, weç get the latest on the scandal including claims of illegal eavesdropping and bribery by journalists working for rupert murdoch's news corp from ned temko of the "london observer." >> ifill: then, we examine president obama's pick to lead a new consumer protection agency. >> woodruff: from indonesia, ray suarez reports on a nation coming to grips with mental health disorders even as its institutions lock up and chain patients. >> this enormous country has almost no psychiatrists,çç leaving the mentally ill with very few options for treatment. >> ifill: kwame holman brings us the latest on the showdown over raising the government's borrowing limit. >> woodruff: and jeffrey brown talks to legendary concert pianist leon fleisher about overcoming a disability that nearly silenced his career. >> if there was a way that i could remain active in music without playing with two hands, well, i had t
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